Communication Breakdown

It happens to the best of us. Communication is such a fickle thing, and the lines of communication can become blurred every so often, especially when love and feelings are involved. Even those who think that they are immune to the confusion of conflict can find themselves drawn into a communication breakdown when they least expect it, and chaos ensues.

Even those of us who are better equipped than many others are not immune. This happened to me on the weekend, and until to be quite honest, it took me by surprise. My spouse told me something that really hurt my feelings, and I automatically lashed back in defense.

It was a silly argument, over something as simple as a misplaced bottle of perfume. But to me, it represented something much deeper that had been simmering away for a couple of weeks. I get frustrated at having to search for something when it is not where I expect it to be, worse still when my partner has shifted it and I don’t know the first place to begin searching.

Perfume, needles and thread, car keys, a Tupperware container to store my baking soda in, covers for our outdoor chairs, all were examples of instances where I had to turn the house upside-down. A simple answer from my spouse when these things were shifted would have saved me a lot of time and frustration. And the answer I got? “You need to open your eyes and organize yourself better”

I was gutted. When I come home from work I exercise the dog and cook dinner so that it is on the table by the time my partner gets home. The house is always spotless and warm, as I’m very conscious of coming home to a tidy environment.

I see this as a fundamental part of my role in coming home first, and it takes a lot of my time. To imply that I have the time to “organize yourself better” really hurt.

I don’t expect praise, but I did hope that my efforts were recognized. I got told that “I don’t expect you to cook my dinner every night.” That was interpreted by me as ingratitude, and hurt me even more.

So where to from here? My spouse felt guilty at coming home every night to the perfect household, where I felt guilty if it wasn’t perfect. It was never about me trying to make my spouse feel guilty, but it seems it did. And this is where the communication fell down. He misinterpreted my efforts, and I misinterpreted his response.

Communication, communication, communication. I needed my partner to keep me informed of where things move to. I need to be informed. I need to voice my frustration before it gets to boiling point. We both need to talk about our feelings more, and how each of our contributions to our home and our relationship make us feel, and how we interpret each others contributions.

Just because something isn’t spoken about, doesn’t mean it’s not important. A relationship or marriage is not a competition, but for many couples it feels like it.

When people feel guilt or stress, it leads them to act funny ways. Often stress and guilt are barriers to communication. The key to overcoming them is to recognize what it is, and have the courage to talk about it. You might be able to do it as a couple, or you might want the help of a friend who can listen to the way you are communicating with each other and offer insights and advice.

We got it sorted out, and kissed and hugged. It wouldn’t hurt so much if I didn’t feel such love at the same time. But it served as a good reminder to me. Sometimes you get so wrapped up in your own emotions that you forget to think of the other person. You also need to entertain the possibility that you are misinterpreting each other. Talking about it is the way to expose the miscommunication and let the healing begin.

A good lesson to learn, even for the experts’

5 comments

  1. I agree 100%. Communication is the only tool we have in relationships, even at work or with friends. I think it is also useful to be in touch with your emotions, another hard thing to do.

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  2. This is so on time! I’m struggling with the lack of communication now, knowing it helped end my relationship. As we flirt with reconciliation, we still don’t communicate as needed. As if the previous issues don’t need to be addressed. Sigh… We’ll worth the read!

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  3. I believe, for you, the key point was that you felt loved. If you didn’t feel loved – communication becomes a real tricky wicket. I agree wholeheartedly that communication is a two-way street. When it becomes a one-way street – the relationship can spiral out of control at warp speed. In my second marriage, my hubby and I created “communication tools.” 1. The ON THE SHELF tool. When one partner is too tired or too upset to talk the topic can go on the shelf for no more than 24 hours when then it must be talked through. 2. The ON THE TABLE tool. This are really big topics that you don’t agree on – yet are not dealbreakers. If the topic, for example MODE (my hubby takes his time with most everything & I am really quick) – I find slowness a bit annoying yet I have agreed to put it on the table – it is not a dealbreaker – and when I feel annoyed, I go back to the table and remember that I agreed to disagree. 3. The CHECK IN tool. We place our hand on each other’s heart and ask the person how their spirit is. Hope this helps! My first marriage couldn’t be fixed.

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